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Nyloxin and Cobroxin: the next great quackery scam

It is LITERALLY snake oil.

 

There's no shortage of BS products to take money from fools, and Nyloxin (and its competing, or perhaps sister, product Cobroxin) is the most recent one to come down the pike. Taking over from past scams like magnets and colloidal silver, Nyloxin is being sold in infomercials, as end cap displays at drug stores, and - most likely - in the classified ad of your local paper.
 
This "product" (I use the term loosely) is sold in both an oral spray and a topical gel form. It purports to contain cobra venom, and to cure pain. All kinds of pain, from all sorts of maladies, from herniated disks to cancer. It is literally a cure-all, and that's not even the fishiest part.
 
What's wrong with Nyloxin? Why is Nyloxin a fraud? Let me count the ways. 
 
First, there is no way to guarantee if there is any cobra venom in this product, or how much, or of what quality. This is a completely unregulated product. 
 
Second, even if it does contain cobra venom, the scientific data on cobra venom having an analgesic effect is skimpy. Nyloxin cites many studies, but all of them were performed with injected venom (not ingested or topically applied). Worse, none of the studies were peer-reviewed, none of them were double-blind, and none of them were performed with a control group. In other words, it's junk science at best.
 
Third, the placebo effect when it comes to pain control is huge. HUGE. 
 
 
Fifth, the company producing it is being run by some very sketchy individuals who have a history of unethical behavior.
 
Sixth, the biggest thing Nyloxin and Cobroxin have going for them is the testimonials of complete strangers online. Oh, and there are testimonials. A veritable flood of them. But A) see above regarding the placebo effect, B) it's pretty easy and cost-effective to pay offshore workers to churn out testimonials for your product, and C) if everyone paid $24.99 plus shipping and handling to jump off a cliff, would you jump, too?
 
I often get accused of being a shill for Big Pharma for saying things like this. Personally I feel like if that's the only criticism someone can make of what I have said, then they are basically admitting that I'm right. People, trust me: this stuff is a scam, and it's probably dangerous. Don't buy it.